Cheri Speak

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Blogenomics: Readership

earn-it

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How Do You Earn a Reader?

Maybe you think about this all of the time. Maybe you haven’t thought about this at all. Maybe you have thought about this, but you’re not sure what the answer is?

As a writer I carefully choose and arrange my words on the page, say a little “Writer’s Prayer” and hit the almighty “Publish” button…and then I wait. You know the drill. You do it too. We all do. But, how many of us actually try to figure out what more we can do to retain our existing readers while generating new ones?

The saying, “If you build it, they will come“, doesn’t really apply to us writers — especially blog writer’s who are in competition with literally millions of other blog writers. We can build and build, but if we don’t find ways to get our masterpieces in front of a lot of eyes, sadly no one comes.

my-readers-rock

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If no one comes, no one reads. If no one reads what the heck did we write for?

I know, I know…some of you write for yourselves, I get it. Most of us however, write because we want to be read. Right?

Not everybody is going to like what we write. That’s a given and that’s OK. But each of us has a core readership we have built or are building (if you are new to blogging, don’t worry it will happen). These faithful followers are the readers we can count on to consume the letters we string together, interact by way of comments, and maybe even share our work with someone else each time we publish a piece.

Having readers is great, but here are three things having a readership obligates us to do in order to keep them:

Satisfaction-Meter

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1. Keep Each Reader Satisfied

Chances are you have readers who are diverse from one another. It would be an easy assumption that these readers have similar tastes since they after all each read your blog. This may or may not be true. Is your blog about a singular topic? Or, like my own, does your blog cater to a variety of topics? Are you paying attention to which articles have gotten the most traction (views) by dissecting your stats? Have you thought about why they did and have you since written others that compliment the ones you wrote before?

At one time, each and every one of our readers found something on our blogs that made them hit the “like” — and hopefully the “follow” or “subscribe” buttons. In other words you got their attention and they liked what you had to say. What have you done to make them like something new or even something different? Keep trying, but don’t forget to cater to what you know they liked in the first place.

Blog-Loyality

Image Source: seventhman.com

2. Keep Each Reader Loyal

Consistency and great content breed loyalty. So does your participation on their blogs (if they have one). Writer’s who post infrequently have a harder time building a readership let alone keeping them around for each successive post.

If writing and posting every day is too much or doesn’t fit into your schedule, then do so every other day or once a week. But, whatever you do, do it consistently so your readers know when to expect something new.

If your readers have their own blogs take the time to pop over and do more than hit the “like” button. Show some love and leave a relevant comment on something they have posted. Interact with their reader’s comments too if it applies.

please-share

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3. Encourage Each Reader to Share

Some bloggers will say they hate to read blogs that ask readers to “share” their posts via social media or re-blogging. I disagree. Utilizing the “share” features available on WordPress further shows a reader’s approval of your work because they find it worthy of sharing in their circles. In addition, if they too have a blog and are trying to generate more (new) readers, then they understand the importance of getting your work in front of other eyes.

Did you know that those with active social media accounts like FaceBook, Twitter, and Pinterest do not have a big cross-over of readers to their blog? It’s true. Social media provides new readers best when other people share your stuff. Besides, if you are using the tools yourself, you have already shared your work with your network when you posted.

What it All Means

Having a readership is an awe inspiring thing. Any writer worth their salt holds their readers dear to their heart and will bend over backwards trying to maintain their interest. When someone reads your work, they are giving you the most valuable thing they have, their time and I for one am eternally grateful.

Thank you!

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23 comments on “Blogenomics: Readership

  1. CheriSpeak
    March 4, 2013

    hahaha the way the title looks before you open it it says “readers hip” rofl

    Like

  2. DaydreamsinWonderland
    March 4, 2013

    This is another excellent post Cheri. More of us should learn to dissect our Stats as you explained. Loyal readers are the best thing any of us can have. A lot of times, they’re better than the actual #’s.

    Like

    • CheriSpeak
      March 5, 2013

      Thank you. I have been dealing with a very sick grand baby and haven’t been able to post in a couple of days so i figured i needed to finish this while it was quiet.

      Like

      • DaydreamsinWonderland
        March 5, 2013

        😦 I’m so sorry to hear that. I hope the little darling feels better soon. My thoughts are with you both.

        Like

      • CheriSpeak
        March 5, 2013

        he’s doing great…but now I’m sick 😦

        Like

      • DaydreamsinWonderland
        March 5, 2013

        Good. Ugh, you & me both, sister. I have a nasty flu. 😦 *hugs*

        Like

  3. eof737
    March 4, 2013

    Thanks for the pingback. I enjoyed reading your post too. I’ve always been an advocate of supporting other bloggers. I also believe that reciprocity keeps the relationships and connections alive. Ironically, this year I’ve been consumed by personal/family issues and the emotional drain has cut into my effort. I’m slowly getting my groove back to commenting but my long absence has exacted a toll. 😉
    Cheers,
    Eliz

    Like

  4. georgefloreswrite
    March 5, 2013

    Good post, Cheri! I’m still getting my act together with the other sites. Again, thank you for the advice. This past month I’ve been reworking material for my agent and once I get that squared away, I’m on to all those sites I need. Have a great week!

    Like

    • CheriSpeak
      March 5, 2013

      Good luck with the agent. I have a proposal for a few agents going out at the end of the week (hopefully).

      Like

      • georgefloreswrite
        March 5, 2013

        Thanks. I am going to keep my fingers crossed for you. You will do good – you are an excellent writer!! Good luck and may you find the right agent for you! 🙂

        Like

  5. diannegray
    March 5, 2013

    Great article, Cheri. I don’ check my stats, but I guess I should start doing that! I also don’t post regularly and this is because I’m very slack (and too busy doing other things a lot of the time). It’s hard for me to follow someone who posts every day (and sometimes 2-3 times a day) because I come here twice a week and there is too much to catch up on 😉

    Thanks for posting all these links – I’m heading over to check them out now 😀

    Like

    • CheriSpeak
      March 5, 2013

      Let me know if you need any help with them. Understanding them really does help you use them.

      Like

  6. Rohan 7 Things
    March 5, 2013

    Great post Cheri! This: “When someone reads your work, they are giving you the most valuable thing they have, their time and I for one am eternally grateful.”

    When you put it like that it really is special that people take the time to read our work. They are usual a part of their life to read what we’ve written 🙂

    Very good advice, thanks for sharing!

    Rohan.

    ps. I shared this post hehe 😉

    Like

    • CheriSpeak
      March 5, 2013

      Well thank you VERY much Rohan!!! I appreciate that very much.
      You know, I think sometimes in our expectation of having a reader we do not take into account that it is in fact their time they are giving us and time is a hot commodity…we only have so much of it and can never get more of it.

      Like

  7. slepsnor
    March 5, 2013

    Great advice. I’ve been spending the last week looking over my posts for which types get the most attention. It’s weird because I think my poetry gets more attention, which means many of my followers are into quick posts. Anything that I post on the process of writing or an opinion piece seems to do well too.

    Like

    • CheriSpeak
      March 5, 2013

      Just keep in mind that “attention” to a post means four things…whether it’s read, whether it’s liked, whether it’s commented on, and whether it’s shared. You could very well have a post that has a ton of “likes” or “comments” but only a handful of “visits” vs. a post with minimal “likes” and “comments” yet a ton of “visits”…

      Like

      • slepsnor
        March 5, 2013

        I’m starting to notice that. I can never figure out what I should be focusing on. I don’t tend to get a lot of comments and visits, but I get a lot of likes. I’m also not sure if I should be tearing my hair out about it. I think I factor in what post seems to attract new followers too.

        Like

      • slepsnor
        March 6, 2013

        I know you don’t usually go for these awards, but this is a brand new one that I just got nominated for. It deals with bloggers who are brave and inspiring. http://legendsofwindemere.com/2013/03/06/the-best-moment-award/

        Like

  8. Corner of Confessions
    March 5, 2013

    I try to distance myself from writing for a audience. I always get disappointed. My blog following is really really small. Yet when i post something superficial my comments and likes and stats go off the charts. But, when i post something personal, something meaningful that i want to share and shout ontop a mountain top, it stays there lonely with no comments or views. So, i just try to accept it. Post what I want. Appreciate the few who do read it and invested their time.

    Like

  9. Kozo
    March 5, 2013

    Great article, Cheri. I have been trying to figure out why some posts get loads of hits while others lie flat like a flounder in the sand–hidden and ugly. I was thinking that maybe a few of us could get together and critique each other We could do it over email, but we would be willing to say, “that post sucked. Here is why.” Just a thought. {{{hugs]}} Kozo
    Hope you feel better.

    Like

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